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This is an unmarked Oil Wick lamp also commonly referred to as a "Teapot lamp". This type is also known as a "Sunshine Lamp" as it was made to burn Sunshine Wax made by the Standard Oil Company. This waxy fuel was made with normal wax paraffin with a small percentage of mineral oil mixed in. The double spout is a good give-away in identifying this type of lamp. The double spout would create a heated dead air space that would help to keep the waxy fuel hot and very soft for burning. This type of lamp could burn other fuels (lard, tallow, various vegetable oils) but was made to primarily burn Sunshine Wax. Conversely, the normal oil wick lamps could not easily use Sunshine Wax as a fuel without the miners doing some tricks and enduring the hassle factor to get them lit and keep them burning.
 
This is another example of the Oil Wick lamp but on a larger scale. Measuring approx 16" from the end of the handle to the side of the lamp and approx 9" from the base of the lamp to the top of the spout. This lamp was used in the coal mines of Scranton, Pennsylvania at the beginning of the 20th Century. This was apparently used as an oil wick hand lamp by the miner, it could also have originally been used as a mine surveyors lamp. A similar type lamp is referenced (right down to the screw in spout and screw cap filler hole), including a photo, in Poh's Flamelight Book, alough the handle was not as long. At the very least a good example of a possible "modified" oil wick lamp. If you have any more info on this type of oil wick lamp or have seen another somewhere else, please let me know.
 

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